Friday, April 18, 2014

What to do if a Job Title Takes Explaining on a Resume

What to do if a Job Title Takes Explaining on a Resume image image.axd

(AKA Should I Change My Title to Something More Common in the Job Market?)

Job titles vary from company to company. It all depends on the nature of the business and the people in charge. Some companies get very creative while others stick to the industry norm. However, when it comes to writing a resume, many people wonder whether they should use their official job title, or change it to something that hiring managers would more easily recognize.

Go with the industry standard. When possible, adjust your title to fit with the industry standard. As your resume passes through parsers or Applicant Tracking Systems, these are the titles that the program will be picking out. If you list your title as “Office Liaison” when a more common title would be “Office Manager” or “Administrative Assistant,” you could actually be decreasing your chances of making it through the initial scanning process. Do a quick job search with your title and see if it results in any matches, or what other common titles that appear are.

If you are worried about not having your exact title listed, the team at Chic Resumes recommends including both. Use the more common title that hiring managers are familiar with and would more quickly recognize, but then include your designated title as well. Once you land an interview you can always elaborate or explain more if questions arise.

Explain unusual jobs. There is a difference between having a unique job title and having a unique job. Some positions are specific to the company or fit into a niche in the industry. If you hold a position that is not well known, make sure to clearly and concisely explain your responsibilities and achievements in your experience. Showcase what you do, how you do it, and what it has accomplished. Although this is true for all positions, with those that are less common, you want to make sure that the hiring manager understands what you do since they cannot necessarily generalize it from the title.

Refrain from over exaggerating. When tweaking your job title to align with what hiring managers are looking for, avoid turning yourself into something that you are not. While you want to make your title recognizable, you do not want to portray yourself as holding a role that you do not actually hold. Minor adjustments are okay, and you can include both titles, but do not change your title simply to make yourself look more experienced or like a better fit for the job. The truth will come out during the interview or when the hiring manager is reading about your accomplishments. You don’t want to start out on the wrong foot by having to explain that you lied on your resume.

Source: B2C_Business

What to do if a Job Title Takes Explaining on a Resume

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